Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing

Novel mathematical

Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing

Recent advances in digital factory science make it possible to print more compliant objects across a wider range of length-scales than conventional engineering processes. A bottleneck for enabling the next technological progress resides in filling the gap in the comprehension of the unprecedented degree of complexity dominating this novel technology.

Mathematics plays a pivotal role in this contemporary industrial revolution: a study recently published by Nature Communications solves a problem of utmost importance for the development of 4d printing, i.e. the possibility to fabricate objects with a programmable shape over time. Professor Pasquale Ciarletta at the MOX Laboratory, Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano, has provided fundamental insights into controlling the sudden nucleation of localised furrows, also known as creases, in soft solids. Continue reading “Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing”

Changing robot capabilities by using self-folding origami “exoskeletons” (video)

self-folding origami

Changing robot capabilities by using self-folding origami “exoskeletons”

From butterflies that sprout wings to hermit crabs that switch their shells, many animals must adapt their exterior features in order to survive. While humans don’t undergo that kind of metamorphosis, we often try to create functional objects that are similarly adaptive — including our robots.

Despite what you might have seen in “Transformers” movies, though, today’s robots are still pretty inflexible. Each of their parts usually has a fixed structure and a single defined purpose, making it difficult for them to perform a wide variety of actions.

Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) are aiming to change that with a new shape-shifting robot that’s something of a superhero: It can transform itself with different “outfits” that allow it to perform different tasks. Continue reading “Changing robot capabilities by using self-folding origami “exoskeletons” (video)”

TU Delft researchers develop new technique to combine 3D Printing & origami folding (video)

3D Printing

TU Delft researchers develop new technique to combine 3D Printing & origami folding

Researchers at TU Delft have combined origami techniques and 3D printing to create flat structures that can fold themselves into 3D structures (for example a tulip). The structures self-fold according to a pre-planned sequence, with some parts folding sooner than others. Usually, expensive printers and special materials are needed for that. But the TU Delft scientists have created a new technique that requires only a common 3D printer and ubiquitous material. Among other applications, their research has the potential to greatly improve bone implants.

In recent years, Amir Zadpoor of TU Delft has become somewhat of an origami master. His team’s work combines the traditional Japanese paper folding art with the more novel technology of 3D printing in order to create constructs that can self-roll, self-twist, self-wrinkle and self-fold into a variety of 3D structures. In 2016, the researchers already demonstrated several self-folding objects. ‘But there were still serious challenges we needed to address’, says Zadpoor. Continue reading “TU Delft researchers develop new technique to combine 3D Printing & origami folding (video)”

Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water ( VIDEO)

polymer

Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water

As 3-D printing has become a mainstream technology, industry and academic researchers have been investigating printable structures that will fold themselves into useful three-dimensional shapes when heated or immersed in water.

In a paper appearing in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials and Interfaces, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and colleagues report something new: a printable structure that begins to fold itself up as soon as it’s peeled off the printing platform.

One of the big advantages of devices that self-fold without any outside stimulus, the researchers say, is that they can involve a wider range of materials and more delicate structures. Continue reading “Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water ( VIDEO)”

Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water (VIDEO)

shape-shifting noodles

Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water

“Don’t play with your food” is a saying that MIT researchers are taking with a grain or two of salt. The team is finding ways to make the dining experience interactive and fun, with food that can transform its shape when water is added.

The researchers, from MIT’s Tangible Media Group, have concocted something akin to edible origami, in the form of flat sheets of gelatin and starch that, when submerged in water, instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, including common pasta shapes such as macaroni and rotini.

The edible films can also be engineered to fold into the shape of a flower as well as other unconventional configurations. Playing with the films’ culinary potential, the researchers created flat discs that wrap around beads of caviar, similar to cannoli, as well as spaghetti that spontaneously divides into smaller noodles when dunked in hot broth. Continue reading “Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water (VIDEO)”

The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing

4D printing

The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing.Unlike 3D printing, 4D printed structures have the potential to transform shape in a pre-programmed way in response to a stimulus (e.g. changes in temperature). These types of structural transformations currently exist outside of additive manufacturing, with research having already demonstrated “shape memory” and “smart material” properties. Continue reading “The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing”

TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs (VIDEO)

self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs

TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs. Researchers at TU Delft have made flat surfaces that are 3D printed and then ‘taught’ how to self- fold later. The materials are potentially very well suited for all kinds of medical implants. They report on their findings in the October 24th edition of Materials Horizons which features this research on its cover.

Continue reading “TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs (VIDEO)”

New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft (Video)

3D-printed material

New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft. Recently, researchers started to engineer not only the outer shape of objects, but also their internal microstructure. Such objects, typically based on 3D cell grids, are also known as metamaterials. Metamaterials are artificial structures with mechanical properties that are defined by their usually repetitive cell patterns, rather than the material they are made of. Continue reading “New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft (Video)”

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference

tikcit

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference , which will take place on 1 February 2017 at Brightlands Chemelot Conference Center in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands

About Tikcit
Organising an event implies many issues, from ticketing to e-payments, from statistics to ordering supplies, from surveys to social media and many many more. Tikcit is the platform to support you. Continue reading “Tikcit is registration platform partner of 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference”