Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing

Novel mathematical

Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing

Recent advances in digital factory science make it possible to print more compliant objects across a wider range of length-scales than conventional engineering processes. A bottleneck for enabling the next technological progress resides in filling the gap in the comprehension of the unprecedented degree of complexity dominating this novel technology.

Mathematics plays a pivotal role in this contemporary industrial revolution: a study recently published by Nature Communications solves a problem of utmost importance for the development of 4d printing, i.e. the possibility to fabricate objects with a programmable shape over time. Professor Pasquale Ciarletta at the MOX Laboratory, Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano, has provided fundamental insights into controlling the sudden nucleation of localised furrows, also known as creases, in soft solids. Continue reading “Novel mathematical approach pushes innovation in 4D printing”

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong

Marc in het Panhuis

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong, at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 18, 2018, at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

Hydrogels are smart and multifunctional materials with a real potential for use novel applications including soft robotics, (edible) sensors and bionic implants. Consisting of a highly swollen polymer network, hydrogels are typically soft and brittle meaning they are not compatible with many traditional techniques used to process materials into structures.

In this presentation, I will demonstrate a variety of (extrusion-based) 3D and 4D printing techniques for processing hydrogel inks alongside other inks of structural polymers to create composite architectures including a smart valve, an artificial cartilage meniscus, an artificial tendon, brain-like structures, edible electronic circuits, stretchable devices and edible/living hydrogels. Continue reading “3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong”

The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing

4D printing

The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing.Unlike 3D printing, 4D printed structures have the potential to transform shape in a pre-programmed way in response to a stimulus (e.g. changes in temperature). These types of structural transformations currently exist outside of additive manufacturing, with research having already demonstrated “shape memory” and “smart material” properties. Continue reading “The Eiffel Tower recovering its shape using 4D Printing”

TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs (VIDEO)

self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs

TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs. Researchers at TU Delft have made flat surfaces that are 3D printed and then ‘taught’ how to self- fold later. The materials are potentially very well suited for all kinds of medical implants. They report on their findings in the October 24th edition of Materials Horizons which features this research on its cover.

Continue reading “TU Delft researchers develop self-twisting of DNA-inspired constructs (VIDEO)”

New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft (Video)

3D-printed material

New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft. Recently, researchers started to engineer not only the outer shape of objects, but also their internal microstructure. Such objects, typically based on 3D cell grids, are also known as metamaterials. Metamaterials are artificial structures with mechanical properties that are defined by their usually repetitive cell patterns, rather than the material they are made of. Continue reading “New 3D-printed material technology lets objects be both hard and soft (Video)”

New shape-changing smart material developed by Washington State University researchers (Video)

smart material

Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, multifunctional smart material that can change shape from heat or light and assemble and disassemble itself. They have filed a provisional patent on the work.

This is the first time researchers have been able to combine several smart abilities, including shape memory behavior, light-activated movement and self-healing behavior, into one material. They have published their work in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. Continue reading “New shape-changing smart material developed by Washington State University researchers (Video)”

Researchers optimize 4D polymer printing with photochemical microreactor

Researchers optimize 4D polymer printing with photochemical microreactor. A team of researchers at the University of Miami has developed a 4D printing system using a massively parallel flow-through photochemical microreactor. The extra “dimension” comes from the 3D printer’s ability to precisely control the monomer composition of each feature in a brush polymer array. Continue reading “Researchers optimize 4D polymer printing with photochemical microreactor”