The effect of 4D printed internal structure on the shape memory effect of shape memory polymers

Jiwoo Choi

by Jiwoo Choi, Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London

One way to 4D print is through the use of Shape Memory Polymers (SMP). these are a type of polymer which react to an external stimulus (e.g. temperature) and subsequently change their shape in a programmed manner. Previous 4D printing research has focused on different material properties (chemistry) or geometric shape (size, thickness etc.) to control its morphing behaviour.

Continue reading “The effect of 4D printed internal structure on the shape memory effect of shape memory polymers”

Dynamic Mechanical Metamaterials – Presented by David Dykstra, University of Amsterdam

David Dykstra

Dynamic Mechanical Metamaterials – Presented by David Dykstra, University of Amsterdam, at 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 17, during the 3D Printing Event at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in The Netherlands.

In years, mechanical metamaterials has surged as a field of research, with many new concepts developed.

Continue reading “Dynamic Mechanical Metamaterials – Presented by David Dykstra, University of Amsterdam”

4D Printing for Smart Cities – Duo presentation by Hiroya Tanaka & Hitomi Kuboki, Keio University SFC

Hiroya Tanaka

Hiroya Tanaka and Hitomi Kuboki from Keio University SFC will speak at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 17, during the 3D Printing Event at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in The Netherlands.

We believe one of biggest application fields of 4D Printing is “Smart City”. We will introduce our novel design of “transformable car” and “environmental facade”, and explain updates of our original hardware (multi-head big 3d printer with super soft materials) and software (g-code editing). Continue reading “4D Printing for Smart Cities – Duo presentation by Hiroya Tanaka & Hitomi Kuboki, Keio University SFC”

4D Shoemaking – Presented by Niek van Sleeuwen, Perflex, Eindhoven University of Technology

4D Printing Conference

4D Shoemaking – Presented by Niek van Sleeuwen, Perflex, Eindhoven University of Technology at the 3rd edition of 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, which takes place on 18 April 2018 at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

The current way we deal with production of footwear is based on quick replacement of your current pair.
Huge pollution from unused half productions, consumerism and no development over time for you as an individual customer are just a few of the problems with the current way of producing. Continue reading “4D Shoemaking – Presented by Niek van Sleeuwen, Perflex, Eindhoven University of Technology”

FIFDM: 3D Printing with Continuous Fiber Reinforcement – Presented by Jens Schlimbach, The Institute for Composite Materials (IVW)

Program Jens Schlimbach

FIFDM: 3D Printing with Continuous Fiber Reinforcement – Presented by Jens Schlimbach, The Institute for Composite Materials (IVW), at the 3rd edition of 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, which takes place on 18 April 2018 at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

The presentation shows practical examples of research into the application of 3D printing technologies with continuous fiber reinforcement – the 4th dimension. The FIFDM process is a technology developed at the Institut für Verbundwerkstoffe at Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. Research combines disciplines including design, material science and manufacturing know-how like robotics and 3D printing. The technology opens new possibilities like free placement or load-specific orientation of the fibers overcoming the limitation of in-plane layup. Methods and materials used will be discussed, along with future expectations and implications of smart materials and 3D printing within creative design potential. Continue reading “FIFDM: 3D Printing with Continuous Fiber Reinforcement – Presented by Jens Schlimbach, The Institute for Composite Materials (IVW)”

3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Interview with Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong

Marc in het Panhuis

3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong, Australia

Marc in het Panhuis is a Professor of Materials Science in the School of Chemistry and a Chief Investigator in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science at the University of Wollongong (Australia). He will speak about 3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 18, 2018, at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

What drives you?

Curiosity to know and understand the world around me.

What emerging technologies/trends do you see as having the greatest potential in the short and long run? Continue reading “3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Interview with Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong”

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong

Marc in het Panhuis

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong, at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 18, 2018, at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

Hydrogels are smart and multifunctional materials with a real potential for use novel applications including soft robotics, (edible) sensors and bionic implants. Consisting of a highly swollen polymer network, hydrogels are typically soft and brittle meaning they are not compatible with many traditional techniques used to process materials into structures.

In this presentation, I will demonstrate a variety of (extrusion-based) 3D and 4D printing techniques for processing hydrogel inks alongside other inks of structural polymers to create composite architectures including a smart valve, an artificial cartilage meniscus, an artificial tendon, brain-like structures, edible electronic circuits, stretchable devices and edible/living hydrogels. Continue reading “3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong”

Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water ( VIDEO)

polymer

Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water

As 3-D printing has become a mainstream technology, industry and academic researchers have been investigating printable structures that will fold themselves into useful three-dimensional shapes when heated or immersed in water.

In a paper appearing in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials and Interfaces, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and colleagues report something new: a printable structure that begins to fold itself up as soon as it’s peeled off the printing platform.

One of the big advantages of devices that self-fold without any outside stimulus, the researchers say, is that they can involve a wider range of materials and more delicate structures. Continue reading “Expanding polymer enables self-folding without heating or immersion in water ( VIDEO)”

Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water (VIDEO)

shape-shifting noodles

Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water

“Don’t play with your food” is a saying that MIT researchers are taking with a grain or two of salt. The team is finding ways to make the dining experience interactive and fun, with food that can transform its shape when water is added.

The researchers, from MIT’s Tangible Media Group, have concocted something akin to edible origami, in the form of flat sheets of gelatin and starch that, when submerged in water, instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, including common pasta shapes such as macaroni and rotini.

The edible films can also be engineered to fold into the shape of a flower as well as other unconventional configurations. Playing with the films’ culinary potential, the researchers created flat discs that wrap around beads of caviar, similar to cannoli, as well as spaghetti that spontaneously divides into smaller noodles when dunked in hot broth. Continue reading “Researchers engineer shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water (VIDEO)”