3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Interview with Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong

Marc in het Panhuis

3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong, Australia

Marc in het Panhuis is a Professor of Materials Science in the School of Chemistry and a Chief Investigator in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science at the University of Wollongong (Australia). He will speak about 3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 18, 2018, at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

What drives you?

Curiosity to know and understand the world around me.

What emerging technologies/trends do you see as having the greatest potential in the short and long run? Continue reading “3D Printing coupled with right materials can impact on solving real-world problems – Interview with Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong”

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong

Marc in het Panhuis

3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong, at the 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, on April 18, 2018, at Brightlands Chemelot Campus in Sittard-Geleen, The Netherlands.

Hydrogels are smart and multifunctional materials with a real potential for use novel applications including soft robotics, (edible) sensors and bionic implants. Consisting of a highly swollen polymer network, hydrogels are typically soft and brittle meaning they are not compatible with many traditional techniques used to process materials into structures.

In this presentation, I will demonstrate a variety of (extrusion-based) 3D and 4D printing techniques for processing hydrogel inks alongside other inks of structural polymers to create composite architectures including a smart valve, an artificial cartilage meniscus, an artificial tendon, brain-like structures, edible electronic circuits, stretchable devices and edible/living hydrogels. Continue reading “3D and 4D printing of edible and living hydrogel materials – Presented by Marc in het Panhuis, University of Wollongong”

Australian researcher introduces 4D printed biomedical valve

Australian researcher introduces 4D printed biomedical valve.A medical breakthrough in Australia might represent the first big step in a new materials science, 4D printing.

No, that’s not a misprint. You’ve heard of 3D printing – also called “additive” manufacturing – where a device not unlike an inkjet printer builds an object by adding successive layers. It’s been done on everything from polymer-plastic desk toys to metallic alloys for spare parts and even human tissues. Continue reading “Australian researcher introduces 4D printed biomedical valve”